A Day I Had Looked Forward To

It has been quite some time since I have been at this lovely little pool, certainly more than one year and I had been looking forward to fishing here.

The pool looked in great condition thanks too all the work parties that had carried out works throughout the seasons.

I had brought with me my trustee Floatcaster “De-Luxe”, not my favourite Floatcaster in my collection, but it has the added backbone to tame a Tench, which is what I was looking for today.

I had setup in a swim that I do not normally fish on the opposite bank. Really nice and level with a little cover, although slightly hazardous casting. It did not take long before the float moved and Roach after Roach crossed the net. This only changed when the Perch began to prowl and I landed perhaps five; but no Tench.

As the afternoon moved onto evening I was sure that weed had begun to drift into my swim, bites became thin on the ground until finally the float dipped under and I landed a whopped of a Tench, totally out-gunned by a large Hardy Altex reel and the Floatcaster. This was quickly followed by a whopping Crucian too.

Apart from last year, I always seem to be fishing on midsummers day and now I try to always make an effort to be out fishing. This evening however was not midsummer-ish at all. The temperature dropped so much that I could see my breath in the air, and it became so cold my head hurt. Never mind, tomorrow would be the Strawberry Supermoon to look forward to.

A New Bed Of Strawberries

I had probably around 40 strawberry plants last year. A lot of these plants had been grown on from runners. These really had not performed well even the previous year, so I made the bold decision last year to take them all out and start again.

With funds from my birthday last November, I purchased four new varieties. All of which develop at different times in the season. Recently arriving through the post, it is now time to get these in the ground.

I also have a completely different area for the strawbs now. They are actually in the bed where the old Gooseberries were. It is in full sun. With a lot of manure including fish, blood and bone meal, I secured black teram over the bed last year in November in order to try and keep weeds down, and to keep the soil warm. Planting through the teram I hope to keep moisture in the soil while cutting down on weeds and hopefully, as the plants grow bigger, they will sit on top of the teram keeping the berries off the soil. I will still have to keep a check on the slugs and snails though.

Tis’ the year of the Don

I already have a couple of really good gardening books in my collection written by Mr Don; Santa has been very good to me this year and kindly gifted me four more. I have began one of them, and I am thoroughly enjoying the read. There is probably one more that I seek, and is hard to find these days entitled “The Prickotty Bush” so I am keeping an eye out for that one to add to the heaving book shelf.

Autumn Cast

I had to think back to the last time that I was able to cast a line. My initial thoughts were the final days of the course fishing season back in mid-March. After looking through my own blog, I remember that I did manage a short fishing trip at the end of June – what a poor fishing year!

This particular local pond used to be full of Roach, which is what I was fishing for today. Waiting for a bite, sipping tea, I cast my mind back to the last time that I was out fishing on my birthday? I deduced that it was actually eleven years ago. At the time, I had purchased my very first split cane fishing rod, and have never opened the rod bag full of my carp fishing “carbons” since. I have added a few lovely split cane rods to the collection over the years too. One of my favourites I was using today, an old Mark IV, with one of my favourite ‘pins’, an Allcocks Aerial.

With the black death (Cormorant) circling above every hour or so, it was clear that this lovely pond had been targeted. This was confirmed when speaking with another angler there. A lot of the small fish are no longer. So I did not catch on my birthday. The wind was storm-force at times, float fishing wasn’t the best idea, making casting somewhat tricky (fishing excuses out of the way). I had a great day non-the-less. I am sure I used to class November as Winter, but today was overcast, dry and warm on this pleasantly mild Autumn day.

A Final Haul

I never thought id ever been picking tomatoes in November and here is the last of them.

Planting everything late this year has extended the season somewhat, but the cold weather has now put pay to the plants themselves, and they have given up for this year.

These too are the final onions. They have just not stored as well as they ought to but they will still get used. and the chillies just keep coming. There are a number remaining on the final plants in the greenhouse. Il wash and freeze these now and use them straight from the freezer.

Chilli Bonanza

My tomato crop this season has been very poor. Although I am still picking a few toms each day, it is nothing like previous years crops. I think that I have a: planted too many plants in the greenhouse, 28 this year where I normally grow about 18-20 plants, and b: planted them too late at the season.

However, I have a great number of Cayenne chillies this season, and more than enough to last me a full year. I’m picking a good handful each week. Used straight from the freezer they will last for ages.

An early clear up

With work so scarce at the moment, I have had the opportunity to keep on top of the allotment more so this year.

I usually don’t have a clear out until the winter, but there were a few jobs that I had just kept putting off. The decision to get rid of all my strawberry plants and start afresh was one that I had not relished. Although I had split them each year, the plants just had not produced anywhere near what they used to; so they are now part of the compost heap. The same applied to my one remaining gooseberry bush. It simply outgrew it’s location and didn’t really produce last season, or this. So the gooseberry bush is no longer either.

I have also removed the whole row of early raspberries (Malling Minerva) which have not performed for years, I should have replaced them some time ago.

So this coming winter I will put planting a new strawberry bed, a whole new row of early raspberries, and will also add six new canes to my main crop raspberries (Glen Ample), along with two new gooseberry bushes in a different raised bed next year.

Back at the little pond

Today, I managed to break away and get a few hours at this little pond. The weather has been just too warm to contemplate fishing, and today the forecast was for thunder and rain.

I arrived at the pond to a cloud-filled sky, and it was still very warm. I chose the same swim that I had fished previously as I was sure that there would be fish taking shelter, (and better oxygen levels) in the bed of lillies. The pond has also a lot of weed growth now aided by the hot weather we have had.

My first cast was met with a lovely little Rudd. There was a lot of fish activity all over the pond and it was difficult to decide where to cast initially, but I stuck to my guns and baited up a small area just beyond the bed of lillies in front of me.

I managed to catch the first Tench of this year’s course fishing season and it was the gentlest of bites, as was the second Tench; both times the float simply slowly dipping. I did miss a few, but a light strike set the hook twice for me today. I also had a slab of a Bream that did not like the camera one little bit and would not sit still for a snap shot; ending upside down in this.

A Different Start This Year

The start of this year’s course fishing season is somewhat different. Due to this Covid 19 pandemic, travel and certainly accommodation are still very much affected; meaning that I was not starting the season as I normally do on the banks of the lovely hidden pools of Wessex.

However, I have found a lovely little pool not too far from where I live, and this is where I resided today. This pond is tiny and some of the fish I have seen here you would really not expect with sizable Carp and Tench cruising the shallows.

I did not land my first Tench of the season today, loosing two great runs being broken each time. Although I did land a nice Perch and a lovely little Rudd.

I’ll be back here again one day for that elusive Tench.

Residents In My Rhubarb

I had no idea as I am visiting my allotment so infrequently at the moment, but a fellow allotmenteer told me that I had Blackbird that had set a nest in my Rhubarb. I did indeed have a Blackbird in my Rhubarb, and she was sitting on four eggs. I left them alone for over a week and have been today to see that the nest is now empty. Hopefully, all four and the parents are doing ok and I look forward to the extra members of the choir when I’m listening to the Blackbirds singing.

First Earlies

I’m sure that I am planting potatoes early this year. I think I will have to look back in my diaries at some point to search for previous years’ plantings. The weather (apart from yesterday’s sleet) has been really mild, and as the sun shone today, the earth was dry – perfect time to get some spuds in.

As every season I am growing “Arran Pilot” again. They have chitted nicely. With a helping of organic fertiliser in the bottom of each trench they are now planted and earthed-up.

This particular raised bed is not quite wide enough to take three rows of potatoes but I managed to get all the remaining onions sets into the remaining space, which was nice.

It is nice to get the hands into soil again.

 

Spring has Sprung!

It has been a very mild and wet winter, it is always great to see the first ‘greens’ of spring.

There are currently restrictions on personal travel, movements and a ban on all social gatherings due to “Corvid-19” or The Corona virus. However, one is allowed one exercise per day;  taking advantage of this unusually warm weather it is time to start planting, getting out into the garden and the allotment. The Rhubarb is shooting away again, as it has every year. I will take a couple of stalks shortly to try in a pie. (That is, unless there is a total lock-down and everyone is not allowed out of their houses).

I had purchased my onion sets for this year some time ago and had left them in trays in the greenhouse. This year I am trying a couple of varieties for the first time – A white onion called “Snowball” and a coloured onion called “Pink Panther” both of which I cannot wait to see how they get on. I have also planted the usual “Sturon” and “Red Barron”. I have most sets in the ground now with only about one hundred remaining to plant.

Potatoes this year are “Aran Pilot”, which I grow every year. To me it is the finest First Early, but my second early and main I have not tried before, they are “Cara” and “Charlotte” both of which I am looking forward to getting in the ground very shortly.

No more rain please

Well, yet again the rain gods frowned upon the last day of this course fishing season. Again, I spent the final days in Wessex. After a couple of days without rain, the river had fallen back into it’s banks and although still flowing quite fast, I ventured forth to give it a try.

What a fool! As I strode from the car in brilliant warm sunshine I wondered why no other anglers were to be seen? It was not long until I found out. I first setup with a float but the current was just too fast, so I re-tackled the rod with a feeder. As I was re-baiting the hook I heard what I thought was the wind really getting stronger through the trees. However, as I looked up I was met with quite literally a wall of white! sleet, and it was really heavy. This was accompanied by a couple of loud rumbles of thunder. It did not take long before I was soaked – no I had not brought a coat or umbrella as the weather was so nice at the start of the day. The only thing I caught today was the beginning of a bad cold.

The next day was spent at a pond, and although I was treated to the first real Blackbird song of the day (full verse and chorus) I did not catch a thing.

As my cold developed on final day of the course fishing season I just had to drive home, sneezing all the way.

Never mind, there is always June 16th to look forward to.

Bringing In The Crops

It has been a while since I have made a chutney from my surplus crops. This has been due to the fact that the past two years have really not been that productive. This year has been very different indeed. Although some fruit and veg have still not produced as well as in previous seasons, I have had a bumper crop of tomatoes; so it’s time for Christmas chutney making.

I’ve grown a number of different tomato varieties this year. As per previous chutney’s that I have made, I am including a bowl of dates, raisins, two cayenne chillies for a little bit of after-heat taste, two bell peppers, muscovado sugar, fresh rosemary, two small tea spoons of mustard, red and white onions, and a bottle of malt vinegar. This is all cooked down for three hours and carefully deposited into oven-hot glass jars. The sharp vinegar taste will disappear completely after these have matured for a couple of Months, and will be grand on the table at Christmas. I will as ever, keep aside a jar for the final day of the course fishing season on the 14th March 2020. I can’t wait to try it now with a slab of cheese, or even better a good quality pork pie, but one must wait.

Great Year For Onions

Although I have had several disasters, notably with broccoli and a number of my fruit crops, this year has been great for onions.

As always I had planted “Sturon” and Red Barron as my main crops which did ok. but I also planted “Ailsa Craig” which did very well indeed. I again planted seeds in November of my giant onions, and by August I had a 4lb 7oz’er.  I left one in the ground for a few more weeks and lifted it at the weight of 5lb 10oz, not a show-winner, but it is my best yet.

Still In Search of Tench

The search for a Tench took me to a club lake close by. This particular pond is known for it’s Tench, although they are caught anywhere on this pond they are known to occupy a certain section of the pond. When I arrived, I found all but two swims to be occupied, and the area I needed to get to catch a Tench was full. Never-the-less, I still setup one rod on the opposite bank and had a good day. I caught numerous Roach and had three really good runs, only for the hook to slip each time. I then resorted to putting on a large carp hook only to then begin catching Bream. Huge clouds of bubbles appeared in my swim which I hoped were Tench but clearly, I had an assembly of Bream in my swim.

The Start of the New Fishing Season

I awoke at four am to the sound of heavy rain. Good and welcome news for the garden and allotment, but not when I was about to take a car journey of over three hundred miles. Although traffic wold be lighter at this time in the morning, I knew that further into my journey the rain would compound delays, I was not wrong. Disregarding an unexpected road diversion that added forty minutes onto my journey, I arrived at my destination eventually around 12:30. I had two options- to check into my accommodation and then track back to do a couple of hours fishing, or I could go straight to the tackle shop to purchase bait and go fishing straight away. The decision was made for me when I called my B&B and there was no answer.

 

I arrived at the pond to find another member already there and I introduced myself to one of the new members. It did not take me long to get a line in the water. The weather was warm and sunny, not perhaps the best fishing weather; but it was pleasant to be back at this ancient pond again. Fishing in a familiar swim, it did not take long before my orange tipped quill float slid away. Roach after Roach came to the bank, along with a few lovely palm-sized Crucians, and two Crucian ‘corkers’ later that day. A great afternoon was had, but sadly there were no signs of a summer, new season Tench for me today.

Spring Equinox

All of a sudden it is Spring again. Although the 20th of March marks the formal start of Spring, it has actually arrived in many forms days and weeks ago. All the Spring flowers are in bloom, and the Blackbird has been serenading for some time now.

I don’t usually plant anything so soon in the growing year, but it has been so mild, and with the warmth to continue I began planting the Onions and Garlic I purchased back in February. One hundred “Red Barron” and two hundred “Sturon” have now been set, along with Garlic, Radish, Carrots, Chard and Beetroot. I have never really had much luck with carrots, but am trying two varieties this season so we will see how they fair. My Rhubarb always does well, and this season is no exception; its off to a flying start.

The 20th of March this year is especially significant as not only does it mark the beginning of Spring, but it is also a full moon. Not only this, but it is a “Supermoon” – a very rare occurrence co-inciding with the beginning of Spring. This particular moon at this time of year is also known as a “Worm” Moon as it signifies the emergence of worms in the soil. The last time this co-incided with Spring was back in 1905!

The Wonder of the World, The Beauty and the Power, The Shapes of Things, Their Colours Lights and Shades, These I Saw, Look Ye Also While Life Lasts. – "Denys Watkins-Pitchford".

Kevin Parr

Writer, fisherman, amateur naturalist and sometime Idler...

Farlows in the Field

The Wonder of the World, The Beauty and the Power, The Shapes of Things, Their Colours Lights and Shades, These I Saw, Look Ye Also While Life Lasts. - "Denys Watkins-Pitchford".

The Field

The Wonder of the World, The Beauty and the Power, The Shapes of Things, Their Colours Lights and Shades, These I Saw, Look Ye Also While Life Lasts. - "Denys Watkins-Pitchford".

Vintage Fishing Tackle

The Wonder of the World, The Beauty and the Power, The Shapes of Things, Their Colours Lights and Shades, These I Saw, Look Ye Also While Life Lasts. - "Denys Watkins-Pitchford".

HUGH MILES - WILDLIFE ADVENTURES

The Wonder of the World, The Beauty and the Power, The Shapes of Things, Their Colours Lights and Shades, These I Saw, Look Ye Also While Life Lasts. - "Denys Watkins-Pitchford".

Caught by the River

The Wonder of the World, The Beauty and the Power, The Shapes of Things, Their Colours Lights and Shades, These I Saw, Look Ye Also While Life Lasts. - "Denys Watkins-Pitchford".

WHERE GREEN ROADS MEET

The Wonder of the World, The Beauty and the Power, The Shapes of Things, Their Colours Lights and Shades, These I Saw, Look Ye Also While Life Lasts. - "Denys Watkins-Pitchford".