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Bringing In The Crops

It has been a while since I have made a chutney from my surplus crops. This has been due to the fact that the past two years have really not been that productive. This year has been very different indeed. Although some fruit and veg have still not produced as well as in previous seasons, I have had a bumper crop of tomatoes; so it’s time for Christmas chutney making.

I’ve grown a number of different tomato varieties this year. As per previous chutney’s that I have made, I am including a bowl of dates, raisins, two cayenne chillies for a little bit of after-heat taste, two bell peppers, muscovado sugar, fresh rosemary, two small tea spoons of mustard, red and white onions, and a bottle of malt vinegar. This is all cooked down for three hours and carefully deposited into oven-hot glass jars. The sharp vinegar taste will disappear completely after these have matured for a couple of Months, and will be grand on the table at Christmas. I will as ever, keep aside a jar for the final day of the course fishing season on the 14th March 2020. I can’t wait to try it now with a slab of cheese, or even better a good quality pork pie, but one must wait.

Great Year For Onions

Although I have had several disasters, notably with broccoli and a number of my fruit crops, this year has been great for onions.

As always I had planted “Sturon” and Red Barron as my main crops which did ok. but I also planted “Ailsa Craig” which did very well indeed. I again planted seeds in November of my giant onions, and by August I had a 4lb 7oz’er.  I left one in the ground for a few more weeks and lifted it at the weight of 5lb 10oz, not a show-winner, but it is my best yet.

Still In Search of Tench

The search for a Tench took me to a club lake close by. This particular pond is known for it’s Tench, although they are caught anywhere on this pond they are known to occupy a certain section of the pond. When I arrived, I found all but two swims to be occupied, and the area I needed to get to catch a Tench was full. Never-the-less, I still setup one rod on the opposite bank and had a good day. I caught numerous Roach and had three really good runs, only for the hook to slip each time. I then resorted to putting on a large carp hook only to then begin catching Bream. Huge clouds of bubbles appeared in my swim which I hoped were Tench but clearly, I had an assembly of Bream in my swim.

The Start of the New Fishing Season

I awoke at four am to the sound of heavy rain. Good and welcome news for the garden and allotment, but not when I was about to take a car journey of over three hundred miles. Although traffic wold be lighter at this time in the morning, I knew that further into my journey the rain would compound delays, I was not wrong. Disregarding an unexpected road diversion that added forty minutes onto my journey, I arrived at my destination eventually around 12:30. I had two options- to check into my accommodation and then track back to do a couple of hours fishing, or I could go straight to the tackle shop to purchase bait and go fishing straight away. The decision was made for me when I called my B&B and there was no answer.

 

I arrived at the pond to find another member already there and I introduced myself to one of the new members. It did not take me long to get a line in the water. The weather was warm and sunny, not perhaps the best fishing weather; but it was pleasant to be back at this ancient pond again. Fishing in a familiar swim, it did not take long before my orange tipped quill float slid away. Roach after Roach came to the bank, along with a few lovely palm-sized Crucians, and two Crucian ‘corkers’ later that day. A great afternoon was had, but sadly there were no signs of a summer, new season Tench for me today.

Spring Equinox

All of a sudden it is Spring again. Although the 20th of March marks the formal start of Spring, it has actually arrived in many forms days and weeks ago. All the Spring flowers are in bloom, and the Blackbird has been serenading for some time now.

I don’t usually plant anything so soon in the growing year, but it has been so mild, and with the warmth to continue I began planting the Onions and Garlic I purchased back in February. One hundred “Red Barron” and two hundred “Sturon” have now been set, along with Garlic, Radish, Carrots, Chard and Beetroot. I have never really had much luck with carrots, but am trying two varieties this season so we will see how they fair. My Rhubarb always does well, and this season is no exception; its off to a flying start.

The 20th of March this year is especially significant as not only does it mark the beginning of Spring, but it is also a full moon. Not only this, but it is a “Supermoon” – a very rare occurrence co-inciding with the beginning of Spring. This particular moon at this time of year is also known as a “Worm” Moon as it signifies the emergence of worms in the soil. The last time this co-incided with Spring was back in 1905!